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Scout, friends, family renovate Paris shooting range

<p>Eagle project: Ryan Moore (right) and friends work on repair signage at the Jack Hatcher Memorial Shooting Range in Paris. Renovation of the range was Moore’s Eagle project. Planning began in July and work was completed in August.</p>

Eagle project: Ryan Moore (right) and friends work on repair signage at the Jack Hatcher Memorial Shooting Range in Paris. Renovation of the range was Moore’s Eagle project. Planning began in July and work was completed in August.

For most teenagers, summer is a time away from school and books, a time for sun, fun, play and lazy days.

That wasn’t the case this summer for 13-year-old Ryan Moore of Paris.

You see, Ryan, the son of Wendel and Beverly Moore, spent several weeks and a number of hours working on his Eagle project. Ryan Moore is a member of Boy Scout Troop 41 of Paris and his father is the Assistant Scout Master.

In addition to acquiring merit badges and fulfilling other requirements, attaining the rank of Eagle Scout requires the completion of a project. Ryan’s Eagle project was the renovation of the Jack Hatcher Memorial Shooting Range, which is located at the old city landfill on Highway 309, north of Paris.

Ryan and his family use the range frequently and, according to his father Wendel Moore, the range “hadn’t had much up keep over the years.” So, renovating the widely-used shooting range was something Ryan decided needed to be done.

Ryan started planning the project in July. He secured the permission of the city of Paris and members of the late Jack Hatcher’s family. The range is named after Hatcher because setting it up was his idea when he was a member of the Paris City Council.

Work began on Aug. 10 and was finished Aug. 24. Ryan spent 250 hours or more on the project and had the help of his family and friends.

“We just wanted to try and make it safe and more enjoyable for the public,” Ryan said.

Signage at the range, which had fallen into disrepair, was replaced. Gun safety rules were put up. A structure at the range was painted. Crusher dust was laid down and enclosed with new landscape timbers. A walkway was built from the entrance to the shooting area. Chicken wire to hold targets was put up, too.

But sometimes, things done had to be redone, Wendel said.

“We put up new chicken wire one night and came back the next day and it had been shot up,” he said. “We just hope people can maintain it.”

Wendel said that there were 13 people at any one time working on the project.

“There was a lot of help and he appreciates it,” Wendel said. “It looked really good when we finished.”

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